DD+ Goes Blogging

DD+ Goes Blogging

“The DD+ blogging community stands as a strong unified voice to push for change in the lingerie industry.”

By Stephanie Foul

Stephanie is a graduate student in DC, holding the blog thegourmetcinephile.

In a sex-driven culture fueled by media stereotypes, women tend to feel insecure about their breasts.

DD+ stands for a bra cup size. But ask anyone what it evokes, and you’ll get these remarks: “huge”, “enormous”, or “fake!”. This misconception leads to greater frustration for women with generous busts who struggle to find stores that can actually help them get a proper fit, as well as stock a diverse range of sizes.

Invest In Your Chest

Above: Invest In Your Chest.

A growing online phenomenon has sought to repair these wrongs: DD+ blogs. Their names are Busts 4 Justice, A Sophisticated Pair, Bras I Hate and Love, Thin And Curvy, Invest In Your Chest, Curvy Wordy, Broods Big Bras, Fuller Figure Fuller Bust, and Bratabase among others. The women who pen these blogs are regular women mainly based in the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia, represent all shapes and sizes, and share an ardent passion for lingerie. Their blogs are filled with lingerie and swimwear reviews, bra-fitting tutorials and tips, and topics related to the effect of pop culture on body image, confidence, and health.

Georgina Horne founder of the Fuller Figure Fuller Bust Blog

Above: Georgina Horne founder of the Fuller Figure Fuller Bust Blog.

“Finding their true size turned into a powerful, transformative and life-altering experience to the bloggers.”

Over time, the bloggers have ventured into other social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, making themselves even more accessible to their visitors’ comments and requests for bra-fitting advice, thus building a considerable online community.

I think most of the problems I had with bras stemmed from not being told how and why bras work, and what they’re supposed to do for your shape”, says Fuller Figure Fuller Bust and 36H blogger Georgina Horne. “I didn’t know that the underwire should sit flat against the body. That the band shouldn’t arch up. What sister sizes were. I wasn’t given the knowledge”.

A Sophisticated Pair

Above and from left: A Sophisticated Pair’s Erica Windle and Deborah Pressimone.

“The blogosphere has a wider audience that most boutiques, and I think a dedicated blogger can make a huge impact on educating readers.” – Erica Windle.

Her struggles to find accurate information mirror those of Erica L. Windle, blog writer of A Sophisticated Pair. She adds she couldn’t find a bra that could fit her. Instead, she had to size up in the band until a DD or DDD cup covered her breasts.

Busts For Justice

Above: Busts For Justice.

Busts4Justice blogger Beckie Williams states she initially assumed the bad fit was just the result of her breast shape, going as far as to believe her body was all wrong (she now wears a 30G size).

The inability to find a good fit, as well as the lack of knowledge and help to obtain that, has led many women with generous busts to assume the bad fit resulted from an abnormal breast shape and to feel even more insecure about their bodies.

Finding their true size turned into a powerful, transformative and life-altering experience to the bloggers. This event forever changed their perceptions about their own body, and even enabled them to get back to working out.

Curvy Wordy

Above: Curvy Wordy.

From then on, they knew they had to help as many women as they could, starting with their friends, and actually opening a store that provided customers with the proper fit and a large range of sizes. Drawing from the overwhelmingly positive feedback they received, Georgina, Erica, and numerous lingerie bloggers created their blogs as empowering platforms to provide women with useful lingerie-fitting advice, purchasing tips, and debates related to the mainstream lingerie industry, feminism and healthy body confidence.

Above: Stephanie Foul gives her Youtube fans her Bra Fitting Tips.

“The blogosphere has a wider audience that most boutiques, and I think a dedicated blogger can make a huge impact on educating readers”, says Erica. There are a lot of blogger success stories out there of women who started off hoping to change the way people thought about bras and are now an authoritative source of knowledge”. This shows how dissatisfied customers turn to online media to finally learn and obtain what they couldn’t get out of a lingerie store: a safe space where requesting advice for a bigger cup size and a smaller band size won’t provoke embarrassing glances, and where happy visitors can then share and exchange their input as to what constitutes a good fit.

Thin and Curvy

Above: Thin and Curvy.

Furthermore, the DD+ blogging community stands as a strong unified voice to push for change in the lingerie industry. Many articles and posts advocate for the addition of DD+ and even GG+ cup sizes to popular lingerie brand lines like Freya, and the release of smaller band-sizes (24-30). Bloggers and their followers declare the lingerie industry should take notice of the disparity of ranges offered to DD+ women, and update the measuring methods used in stores. Finally, they demand the lingerie industry take the needs and expectations of the everyday women, by integrating models of all body shapes and sizes in the campaigns.

The DD+ blogging phenomenon is fascinating because of its ability to capture women’s frustrations and insecurities about their bodies, and turn those feelings into empowering forces able to influence their peers and an industry that has long ignored them.

The bloggers have high hopes for the future: “I think having multiple bloggers contributing would provide our readers with more comprehensive information” concludes Erica. “As for the rest of the blogging community, I hope we continue to grow and expand to include new perspectives, but I also hope the DD+ lingerie and clothing industries grow with us”.

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